Pima County Scam Squad warns of porn scam

A resident presented the Scam Squad with a warning to share with all personal computer users. This gentleman stated that while using his computer, a “porn site” popped up. He immediately clicked out of the site, and did not think about it again. The next day, when he opened his computer, an alleged FBI website appeared, with what looked like all the correct official-appearing logos of a government agency. This “document” stated that he was being accused of visiting an illegal site which contained child pornography. His computer was frozen on the site, and there was a button to “hit” or click on to resolve the matter by paying an assessed fine.

There was a further threat that law enforcement would come directly to his home and seize his computer for evidence, and take him directly to jail if he did not pay the fine. Lt. Deanna Johnson of the Pima County Sheriff’s Department advised in a previous publication that before a fine is assessed for any violation, a person must first be arrested for a crime, exercise the right to due process, and be found responsible or guilty. If none of these things have occurred, a fine will not be assessed.

If this should happen to you, seeing the official looking document from the FBI on your computer, and remembering the porn site from the night before, will certainly increase your heart rate and may frighten you into paying the requested fine to avoid any further embarrassment—Stop! You did not seek out this site, and no governmental agency will ask you to pay a fine on line for an accusation of which you have not been found guilty in a court of law!

How can all this happen? Remember “Clickjack?” This is the term used to describe when someone takes over a computer as a result of you “clicking” on a fraudulent link. The scammer can then take control of your computer. Similar to a carjacking, the information in your computer has been stolen. Your computer is vulnerable to a “Clickjack” when you unknowingly open a portal of entry for the scammers by clicking on an unknown site. Be careful what sites you “like.” “Clickjack” may also appear in an e-mail, from an unknown source, sometimes advertising enticing, interesting offers. All you have to do is click on the provided e-mail address and your computer has been “Clickjacked.” Remember, delete any emails from unrecognized sites. And do not fall for the scam of being told to pay a fine before even being arrested for a crime.

The above mentioned gentleman notified the Scam Squad about his experience, and he requested we use his story as a warning. He does not want anyone to become a victim of this scam.

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