563rd Guardian Angels rescue fishermen of coast of Mexico

An U.S. Air Force HH-60G Pavehawk helicopter from the 55th Rescue Squadron flies above the Pacific Ocean in route to rescue two critically burned sailors 600 nautical miles of the coast of Mexico May 5, 2014. Airmen from the 563rd Rescue Group flew in a 79th RQS HC-130J Combat King II aircraft for nearly 11 hours, to parachute Guardian Angel teams near the ship, with two inflatable zodiac boat packages and medical equipment, so that they could deliver lifesaving care and stabilize the injured sailors. Guardian Angels are the only Department of Defense combat forces specifically organized, trained, equipped, and postured to conduct full spectrum personnel recovery operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Adam Grant)
An U.S. Air Force HH-60G Pavehawk helicopter from the 55th Rescue Squadron flies above the Pacific Ocean in route to rescue two critically burned sailors 600 nautical miles of the coast of Mexico May 5, 2014. Airmen from the 563rd Rescue Group flew in a 79th RQS HC-130J Combat King II aircraft for nearly 11 hours, to parachute Guardian Angel teams near the ship, with two inflatable zodiac boat packages and medical equipment, so that they could deliver lifesaving care and stabilize the injured sailors. Guardian Angels are the only Department of Defense combat forces specifically organized, trained, equipped, and postured to conduct full spectrum personnel recovery operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Adam Grant)

An U.S. Air Force HH-60G Pavehawk helicopter from the 55th Rescue Squadron flies above the Pacific Ocean (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Adam Grant)

On Monday, at around 12:30 p.m. Arizona time, six U.S. Air Force Guardian Angel personnel from the 48th Rescue Squadron (RQS), and the two injured fishermen they were stabilizing, were hoisted off of a Venezuelan skiff more than 600 nautical miles off the Pacific coast of Mexico.

The two HH-60G Pavehawk helicopters from the 55th RQS and a HC-130J Combat King II from the 79th RQS flew for nine hours over the Pacific Ocean to recover the GA personnel and patients, and conducted four refueling operations on the roundtrip flight from Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The pararescuemen provided lifesaving medical care to the patients and stabilized them for transport to the University of California, San Diego, Regional Burn Unit in California.

The helicopters returned to Cabo San Lucas around 5 p.m. Arizona time and transferred the patients to a 79th RQS HC-130J Combat King II for transport to Naval Air Station North Island, Calif., with an estimated time of arrival of 7:30 p.m.