No schedule, no money, ADOT wants Tucson Phoenix rail system

light-railThere is currently no construction schedule and no funding identified to build a rail system between Phoenix and Tucson, but that hasn’t stopped the Arizona Department of Transportation from reminding “everyone” that there is still time for the public to provide input on three plans that have been selected for further study by the department.

Last summer, ADOT narrowed the list of rail alternatives to three: the Green Alternative, which would run along Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson; the Orange Alternative, which would serve East Valley population centers and share part of its alignment with the planned North-South Freeway Corridor; and the Yellow Alternative, which would also serve East Valley communities and share right of way with Union Pacific Railroad north of Eloy, where appropriate.

All three alternatives would run along I-10 south of Eloy and would also follow I-10 and US 60 in the western part of Maricopa County

On May 15, ADOT will host a public outreach event from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of First Avenue and Washington Street in CityScape in downtown Phoenix. Community members stopping by ADOT’s passenger rail booth during the lunchtime hours will have the opportunity to speak with members of the study team and fill out a survey with their thoughts about passenger rail.

Additional outreach events are still being considered during the month of May and will be announced as they are finalized. In addition, members of the public can participate and comment through an online survey until May 31. The survey, maps of the three alternatives and participation booklet can be found atazdot.gov/passengerrail.

ADOT has already received a large response from participants — more than 10,000 surveys and comments have been received both online and during public outreach events during the past three years of the study.

Last summer, ADOT narrowed the list of rail alternatives to three: the Green Alternative, which would run along Interstate 10 between Phoenix and Tucson; the Orange Alternative, which would serve East Valley population centers and share part of its alignment with the planned North-South Freeway Corridor; and the Yellow Alternative, which would also serve East Valley communities and share right of way with Union Pacific Railroad north of Eloy, where appropriate. All three alternatives would run along I-10 south of Eloy and would also follow I-10 and US 60 in the western part of Maricopa County.

The study still includes the no-build option.

4 Comments

  1. And this rail system will serve what purpose? Presently there does not exist a need for rail to east LA because it does not plan to connect to anything up there. Wont go to the airport, wont be in an area where you get public transportation, will not be a train to carry vehicles for people to use so just what is the need other than some whiners want one?

    10000 responses out of 2 million or so people in the area and this is a raging demand for this? Someone must have land for sale or are going to make big bucks off this. Remember how deconcini made his $$$$ getting land and then selling it to the gov’t for the CAP! Tucson is not a suitable bedroom community for east LA as they claim ther eis nothing here! no night life or is this to be a continuation for the trolly folly from the UA to the ‘bars’ downtown? Ride the trolly to downtown to catch the trolly to east LA and its night life????

  2. Still waiting for pothole repair by pothead government decision makers. Something is wrong here folks. You can’t keep ignoring it.

  3. there’s plenty of demand to go to phoenix – it’s the reason the airline fare between here and Phoenix is so high – if it were any cheaper it would be like a bus – keep a car at both ends and fly to phoenix for work… would be common – the price so far stays prohibitive

  4. This makes more sense than some people might think. When there’s rail between the two cities, the job markets become open to people in each other’s cities. I wouldn’t think twice about looking for a job in PHX if I had to drive from TUS every day, yet there are thousands who do it because in general, the TUS job market sucks and the PHX market pays more for the same skillsets. If I could hop the train, being able to sleep or work while on the way makes it more feasible.

    We already see this type of city-to-city service for day riders between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, Chicago and Milwaukee, and San Diego & Los Angeles. It also exists to a lesser degree between Ogden, Salt Lake, and Provo.

    I-10 is saturated, and that’s with three lanes most of the way between the two cities.

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