Regents approve contract extensions for ASU, UA and ABOR presidents

Weaver Hart

Weaver Hart
Weaver Hart
University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart must being doing something right if Governor Jan Brewer and Sarah Brown Smallhouse aren’t happy with her and on Wednesday, despite their prickly displeasure, the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) authorized one-year extensions of multiple-year contracts for Hart, Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow, and ABOR President Eileen I. Klein.

The board action extends President Crow’s contract through June 30, 2019; Dr. Hart’s contract through June 30, 2017; and ABOR President Klein’s contract through June 30, 2017.

Crow has served as president of Arizona State University since July 1, 2002. Dr. Hart’s initial contract began with her appointment July 1, 2012, and President Klein’s appointment began February 4, 2013.

“President Hart has charted and deployed critical strategic academic and business plans that are catapulting the university to be a super land-grant university, with a presence in all 15 counties in the state, advancing global impact while ensuring academic excellence,” Chair Killian added. The UA has 41,800 students enrolled, with a record diversity of freshmen students (7,000) of 41.4 percent. The UA last year produced $629 million in research expenditures and 21 patents issued. It is ranked by the National Science Foundation as 19th in research and development expenditures among public universities. The UA ranks 50th in the world and 37th nationally according to the Center for University World Rankings.

As ABOR president, Klein oversees the $4 billion Arizona public university enterprise – ASU, Northern Arizona University and UA, and manages the Enterprise Executive Committee (EEC), composed of the university presidents, which is responsible for achieving the ambitious 2020 goals outlined in the Board of Regent’s strategic plan. “President Klein’s outstanding talent as a strategic fiscal and executive leader, in both the public and private sector, and as a leader of policy reform, has accelerated the board’s capacity toward achieving critical goals for the state,” said Chair Killian. “Under her direction, we are confident the board will continue to meet its ambitious goals toward increasing degree production and research activity, as well as reforming both the instructional delivery model and financing of the university system to support and stimulate Arizona’s economy.”

“We are truly pleased to have all three presidents continue to serve the state and our students with their innovative leadership,” said Chair Killian.

There were no financial changes made to the contracts. The board anticipates reviewing contract performance incentives for all presidents, including NAU President Rita Cheng, who began her appointment on August 15, 2014, at its meeting on September 25 at NAU.

Also the regents approved the appointment of Gregg Goldman to serve as UA senior vice president for business affairs and chief financial officer for the university.

The hard-drinking-cosmetologist-turned-Governor’s most recent appointee to the Board, Bill Ridenour, cast the lone opposing vote against Hart.

2 Comments

  1. It’s great and re-affirming to see that Madame Hart’s mediocre, out-of-touch occupancy of the UA president’s chair is being rewarded, especially when those lofty figures tossed about have absolutely *nothing* to do with her tenure.

  2. This UA President is the President of Campus discourse.
    She has doubled the size of her staff from the previous President, and raised pay for each position in her office much greater than inflation while the lower part of the University workers have gotten maybe 3% in 5 years. The President of class separation.
    Many lower half workers have actually lost income with medical and retirement contribution increases. Some janitor and build maintenance workers make about $13 an hour. And this President hands out money in her office to new record levels by a double digit figures.
    Gerry Robinson
    This is a insult to the lower 75% workers on campus. A slap in their face. Her office is raking in any extra cash the campus can muster, while most of the others go ignored.

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