Red Pill Approved Comics – Best Of August 2015

They say the road to Hell is paved with good intentions… and that appears to be true for Sandy Bahr. She and some in her posse seem to mean well …… problem is the forests are going up in flames from the lack of good management by the feds…. So, Sandy go away and destroy something else…. we simply can’t afford your brand of “good”

SANDY-BAHR

Aground On A Sandy Bahr: Sunday’s Comic

Thanks to Sierra Club state lobbyists like Sandy Bahr – forests across the west are on fire. Fighting management of our forest, the Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity are continually blocking efforts to manage the forest and actually conserve them rather than leave them prone to fires… fires that kill owls, eagles, frogs, deer, and now wolves….

Center For Biological Diversity “Nothing More Than A Litigation Machine”

In response to the Center for Biological Diversity recent statement that “Nor are goshawks or great horned owls a threat to Mexican spotted owls”

Research has shown that there is considerable spotted owl deprivation by other birds of prey across the country, and Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD) officials have confirmed that here in Arizona, Mexican Spotted Owl (MSO) predators include great horned owls, red tail hawks and goshawks. The Center for Biological Diversity has simply not provided any evidence to the contrary, that for some strange, unaccountable reason, these birds of prey are leaving the MSO alone here in Arizona.

In response to the Center for Biological Diversity recent statement that the “Center didn’t Sue over any timber sale in the San Juan Fire area. That ‘fact’ was also made up.”

Senior level U.S. Forest Officials stated that actions taken by the Center for Biological Diversity were instrumental in stopping the NEPA-approved forest thinning operations in Eastern Arizona, that later accounted for the 7,000 acres of burned forest during the 2014 San Juan fire. Perhaps they did not “sue,” but their actions directly contributed to a huge, catastrophic wildfire that tragically harmed the ecosystem’s “biological diversity,” including the tragic deaths of all types of wildlife, and both threatened and endangered species. What does a wildfire-charred Mexican Spotted Owl smells like?

To read more: Center For Biological Diversity “Nothing More Than A Litigation Machine” click here

Oregon forest owners, operators making big difference in the fire fight

In the massive, multi-agency effort to corral dozens of wildfires burning across the state, the work of Oregon’s private forest owners and operators often gets overlooked. To borrow from firefighting lingo, these landowners are the true “first responders” when it comes to battling fires. If a timber harvest operation sparks a small fire, for example, in most instances the loggers on scene put it out immediately. But only a fraction of the blazes are started by their activities.

“It is worth noting that the large majority of human-caused fires are not industrial related,” said Rex Storm with Associated Oregon Loggers. “Most result from carelessness and not from industrial activities such as logging.”

When large fires do occur, whether from lightning or people, forest landowners figure as a major player in the suppression actions. The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Astoria District Forester, Dan Goody, recalls the way forest owners in his area responded when he advised them earlier this summer about predicted extreme weather conditions.

To read more: Oregon forest owners, operators making big difference in the fire fight, click here