House Passes Teenage Driver Texting Ban Bill

Speaker of the Arizona House gave SB1080, a bill that prohibits teenage drivers from texting, a second life this week and on Thursday it passed on a bipartisan vote. The controversial bill passed on a 32-24-3 vote.

Rep. Phil Lovas had blocked the bill, but when he left the House to take a position in the Trump administration Mesnard saw his chance and took it.

Texting ban bills have been unpopular. However, SB1080 passed due to the fact that it only targeted teens.

ALLEN J N ALSTON Y ANDRADE Y BARTON Y
BENALLY N BLANC N BOLDING Y BOWERS N
BOYER N BUTLER Y CAMPBELL Y CARDENAS Y
CARTER Y CHÁVEZ Y CLARK Y CLODFELTER Y
COBB Y COLEMAN N COOK Y DESCHEENIE Y
ENGEL Y EPSTEIN Y ESPINOZA Y FARNSWORTH E N
FERNANDEZ N FINCHEM N FRIESE Y GABALDÓN N
GONZALES N GRANTHAM N HERNANDEZ NV JOHN Y
KERN N LAWRENCE Y LEACH Y LIVINGSTON Y
LOVAS V MARTINEZ N MITCHELL N MOSLEY N
NAVARRETE N NORGAARD N NUTT Y PAYNE Y
POWERS HANNLEY N RIOS NB RIVERO Y RUBALCAVA NV
SALDATE Y SALMAN N SHOOTER Y SHOPE N
STRINGER Y SYMS Y THORPE Y TOWNSEND N
UDALL N UGENTI-RITA N WENINGER Y MESNARD Y

SB1080 Facts:

Provisions

1. Prohibits instructional permit holders from operating a motor vehicle while using a wireless communication device.

a. Allows use during specific emergency situations.

b. Prohibits citation without reasonable cause another violation has occurred. (Sec. 1)

2. Prohibits Class G licensees during the first six months or until the licensees 18th birthday from operating a motor vehicle while using a wireless communication device.

a. Allows use during specific emergency situations.

b. Permits use of an audible turn-by-turn navigation system under specified conditions.

c. Prohibits citation without reasonable cause another violation has occurred. (Sec. 2)

3. Becomes effective on July 1, 2018. (Sec. 3)

4. Makes conforming changes. (Sec. 2)

Current Law

A person who is at least 15 years and 6 months of age may apply for a Class D or G instructional permit. The instructional permit allows the permittee to drive a vehicle on the public highways if driving in possession of the permit and accompanied by a person who has a Class A, B, C or D license, is at least 21 years of age and occupies a seat beside the permittee (A.R.S. § 28-3154).

Additionally, a person who is under 18 years and at least 16 years may apply for and obtain a Class G driver’s license. For the first six months or until the 18th birthday, a Class G licensee is restricted under certain conditions from operating a motor vehicle on a public highway from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m. or at any time with more than one passenger under age 18. Violation of either restriction is subject to civil penalties of incremental severity. The first violation is subject to a maximum civil penalty of $75 and an extension of the restriction for an additional 30 days. The second violation is subject to a maximum civil penalty of $100 and an extension of the restriction for 60 days. The third violation is subject to a civil penalty of $100 and suspension of license privileges for 30 days (A.R.S. § 28-3174).

5 Comments on "House Passes Teenage Driver Texting Ban Bill"

  1. The bill should have applied to ALL DRIVERS banning cell use behind the wheel for any reason! How many more people have to die before we get meaningful legislation?

  2. There is so much wrong with this bill which is really just a watered down version of what is needed. Go after the people that are too young to vote? Are you kidding me?? What makes them think that 6 months is enough time for a teenage driver to hone their skills at driving before they are allowed to text, talk, play video games, etc. The carnage will continue until they grow the balls to legislate a real bill that will actually save lives.

  3. Its not enforceable like the seat belt laws. Ya gotta be stopped for a real violation before you can be cited! So who is going to enforce, or will this be a stepping stone to stop for various ‘imagined’ violations to get to the secondary violation.

    Actually just what we really needed another ‘unenforceable’ law/regulation. Will it be like the local bicycle helmet law where the cops drive by kids and honk and wave?

  4. whitesuburbanmom | April 21, 2017 at 10:40 am | Reply

    I agree with Hank. It’s virtually unenforceable unless law enforcement witnesses the use first hand. The teenager who rear-ended me three weeks ago while she was texting just told the police she had no idea what happened when they arrived 10 minutes later. Ho Hum!

    • Common Sense | April 22, 2017 at 8:14 am | Reply

      It is also Unconstitutional as it applies to only a certain category of people, which is discriminatory.

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