CBP K-9 sniffs out largest fentanyl seizure in agency’s history

NOGALES — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers seized almost 650 pounds of narcotics, fentanyl and methamphetamine, with a street value of about $4.6 million, when a 26-year-old Mexican national tried to enter the United States through the Port of Nogales with a truckload of vegetables.

This was the largest seizure of fentanyl in CBP history.

The methamphetamine seizure represents the third largest at an Arizona port of entry.

The truck driver was arrested, remanded to Homeland Security Investigations and charged with two counts of possession with intent to distribute controlled substances. He is being held in federal custody.

Officers discovered more than 400 narcotics packages within a hidden floor compartment of a trailer loaded with cucumbers.

After a CBP narcotics K-9 alerted on the compartment, officers seized nearly 254 pounds of fentanyl with a value of about $3.5 million and almost 395 pounds of methamphetamine valued at $1.1 million.

Nogales Area Port Director Michael Humphries lauded his staff for their outstanding interdiction.

“Opioids pose a real danger to every community in America and are having fatal consequences across our nation,” Humphries said. “This past weekend our CBP officers were able to stop an enormous amount of these deadly narcotics from hitting our streets.”

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid drug, with a potency roughly 100 times greater than morphine. It was originally developed to control pain for cancer patients.

Large quantities of fentanyl have been manufactured in China, but it is now mostly made in Mexico, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

Special Agent in Charge Scott Brown, of Homeland Security Investigations said this case is an example of a successful collaboration between HSI and CBP.

“These efforts exhibit the combined resources of law enforcement agencies’ resolve to combating these deadly drugs from entering our communities,” Brown said.

The Mariposa Land Port in Nogales is the fourth busiest port of entry in the United States. Sixty to 70 percent of all Mexican winter-harvested fruits and vegetables, and nearly one-third of all Mexican produce year-round passes through this customs facility, according to the Produce Blue Book.

5 Comments

  1. albert just think, the left wants to LEGALIZE drugs and then tell ya how it will be just like alcohol! They have already found that ‘legalized MJ’ is causing accidents far in excess of what they prophesied and there is little being said about it. OBTW what about the increase in taxes to be realized? Oh thats right they still prefer the illegal stuff as it isnt taxed! Much like the cigarette taxes, people quit now they are raising taxes to make up for the lost revenue of people quitting, guess it will never end now will it.

  2. And to add a real world perspective, it was U.S. Big Pharma that addicted millions to their opioids. If Americans weren’t buying this stuff, no one would be smuggling it in. Capitalism 101 — supply and demand.

  3. To put this into proper prospective, 254lbs of fentanyl is enough to kill more than 115 MILLION people from opioid poisoning.

    The Oracle

    • And we do not know how much of this and other deadly drugs were not interdicted at the border, or in Pima County, thanks to the Pima County Dems`failure to allow the Sheriff to accept the Stonegarden grant monies which would have enhanced our law enforcement efforts in the county. It is understandable when government officials act out of ignorance but it should be unacceptable in a democracy when those in charge of the government act out of such willful ignorance as the Pima Dem majority on the BOS did when it rejected the Stonegarden grant just to score political points. Worse, the only political point was to register their hatred of a President elected by the people. We must also ask ourselves what kind of people are the voters who go along with such willful undermining of law enforcement, an undermining that can result in harm even to themselves and their families?

Comments are closed.