The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fail To Serve The Public

On Sunday, January 28, 2018, an article in the business section of the Arizona Daily Star titled, “Rosemont Mine ready to Build if Final Permit goes Through,” tells how Hudbay Mining is ready to build and can begin mining in 2022. I have written several articles in the Arizona Daily Independent: June 26, 2017, “Mining Permits are Bad Law, and November 13, 2017, “Have The Local Liberals Gone Crazy,” and December 11, 2017, “They’re Back… Anti-Rosemont Thieves,” concerning the blockage of permitting for Rosemont Mine. The most ridiculous bias relies on revenue and approval or rejection of the water issues of Rosemont Mine by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District and San Francisco Division and such bias should be outlawed.

The California public mind-set is anti-mine development by an out-of-control hot-bed of ill-informed, so-called environmentalists. Permitting and mine development should be the responsibility of local mine leaders, not by public interest lawyers retained by not-for-profit public interest groups.

For over a decade, Rosemont Mine has been a target of abuse from people who do not have expertise in mining, economic development and the constitutional rights of enterprise.  The regulatory branches of the Los Angeles District and San Francisco Division have historically had an image of “sitting on their ass” and rejecting the Rosemont Mine through illegal delays. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers needs congressional law in order to remove them from any mine permitting authority. In many ways, our country is ruled by bureaucratic idiots who wish open borders and complain that a wall on our Southern border through New Mexico and Texas should not be completed. Prototype walls should be put to test and demonstrate how they can or can’t be scaled. The same goes for anti-mine advocates, who need to show proof of actual alarm and not be allowed to speculate on assumed harm.

Further, the concept that mine property or any other property can be condemned or zoned for non-use without purchase of the property by full and fair market value is outright stealing and needs to be retroactively eliminated.

Our democratic constructional freedoms are attributed to concepts of protecting property ownership and the freedom to engage in enterprise. This is what makes America great.  The constant erosion of personal ownership and investment capital by welfare society advocates powered by liberal elitists is making our country 20+ trillion dollars in debt, and a third-world bankrupt nation.

  David V. MacCollum

There are other ways to correct the abuse on Rosemont and other mines. The Rosemont Mine needs only a permit from the Forest Service to spread the spoil and excess rock from the open pit that is on Rosemont’s property. Their mining plan includes covering the spoil with top soil so it will be useable for cattle grazing. Consider that the western states are primarily owned by the Federal government and do not provide a tax base. The mining companies should be authorized to buy government property and return it to a tax base. This would eliminate the time-consuming and costly permitting process that mining companies wrongfully must put up with. The Federal government owns too much land that needs to be returned to public ownership. Such a program could be used towards paying off our national dept.

By holding onto public lands, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service does not serve the interest of the public or enterprises by not selling the land of portions thereof, which are needed by mining companies, as such land holds no value as a recreational resource.

Articles mentioned above:

8 Comments on "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fail To Serve The Public"

  1. Most commonsense Southern Arizona residents are in favor of this mine and the large amount of jobs it will bring to this God forsaken jobless, no growth county. The Sierra Club, and the Center for Biological Diversity do not represent the hardworking blue collar population. As a born and raised Tucson resident I am incensed that out of state bird watchers, tree huggers, and out of touch California based Federal agencies are making decisions that effect the prosperity and well being of local residents. It is time to build the mine. MAGA

  2. Chris Horquilla | February 12, 2018 at 10:37 am | Reply

    An analysis of the EPA’s most recent report (November 30, 2017) on the Rosemont Copper project shows the holdup of issuance of the 404 permit is due to one factor: the fact that the mine will likely cause a reduction in the flow of water to downstream users. This is a water rights issue, not an environmental issue.

    To deny Rosemont Copper or matter of fact anyone else a permit based on this reason would be precedent setting. If it becomes a realty, it would not only result in a lawsuit in the case of Rosemont, but would make any developer liable to lawsuits brought by anyone living downstream from their proposed development.

  3. what’s the line in Vegas this mine opens?

  4. When this mine was first proposed I was against it from purely an environmental stand point ( My family has ranch 5 miles from Zortman Montana -The Zortman/Landusky mine is a Super fund site- So I know what damage can be done by mining companies). But I read the proposed reclamation plan and if the reclamation plan is done correctly, this mine should be given the permission to operate. I have worked cows and on movies (Desperado and Posse) at the exact site of this mine, there is a natural beauty in area that I would hate to lose, but it will not be lost if we Verify that the reclamation is being done. Just my 2 cents

  5. borderbill (a NIMBY/BANANA) | February 12, 2018 at 5:05 pm | Reply

    Bullshit. It’ll use too much water and fuckup the area. These clowns wanna dig, they can reopen the mines in Bisbee, Ajo; and others. Leave the Santa Ritas alone.

    • Chris Horquilla | February 12, 2018 at 11:01 pm | Reply

      Bisbee and Ajo are owned by Freeport-McMoran. Hudbay owns the mineral rights at Rosemont. They have complied with our nation’s laws with regard to the permitting process and accordingly should be allowed to proceed with the mine’s development.

    • borderbill-Why don’t you become part of the solution by helping efforts to develop needed natural resources with least damage possible? There is beautiful wild country in Bisbee, Ajo, and elsewhere and the historic mines there are not being re-permitted. Or are you just a NIMBY?

  6. The Oracle of Tucson | February 13, 2018 at 8:21 am | Reply

    We should open the mine as soon as possible, we can use the the excavated rock as cheap fill on the border wall project.

    The Oracle

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*